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Thursday, August 12, 2010

The waiting game

Waiting is painful! I have got waiting down to an art in some areas of life. My experience of hospital waiting rooms amounts to numerous hours. In a typically British way I never grumble at this as it is something I am used to and I have been the emergency case that jumped the queue on previous occasions. So instead I settle down with a good book and except I'm investing time in my health.

Waiting to hear back about writing projects is a different ball game. No novel is long enough to cover the kind of periods you have to wait and very soon creeping doubts begin to set in. I have no less than 8 writing projects being considered or judged at the moment. I should hear back about most of them by the end of this month/beginning of September. The creeping fear is the prospect that none of these will be picked. There is a very real chance for writer's that this will be the case when submitting work to a flooded market. Knowing that provides little comfort when your hard work and idea's are being rejected. As some of these projects are local (thus less entries) I hold out a little more hope than usual. I will be very happy with just one of these projects being selected but the waiting produces the butterflies in your stomach feeling.

My remedy to this feeling is a similar tactic to the one I use when hanging around in NHS waiting rooms. It's generally to keep my brain occupied. So I am setting myself a task. I work better when I have specific deadlines to aim for so I am setting myself some for the rest of the year. The next three weeks will see me getting into the swing of it and hopefully stop any anxieties I have about other projects. I'll lay out my challenge in my next blog.

Do you get the same anxieties and what is your remedy?

2 comments:

  1. "There is a very real chance for writer's that this will be the case when submitting work to a flooded market."
    The trick is to find a sector of the market that is not saturated! For 'bread and butter' work, why not look at text books or training manuals on a subject you are totally familiar with? It may not be what you want to do, but it will enhance the skillset and help pay the bills.

    And don't rely too much on small checkers! "I settle down with a good book and except I'm investing time in my health" Should be 'accept'!
    :)

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  2. Hi Ian,

    Thank you and I am doing my best to do all of the above.

    Also take your correction with thanks! I'm dyslexic so some mistakes slip through the net. As I explained in my very first post I apologise for them as don't get enough time to check them all on here. :)

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